Home » Rebellious Lawyering Conferences of the Rebellious Lawyering Institute

Rebellious Lawyering Conferences of the Rebellious Lawyering Institute

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Rebellious Lawyering Conferences promote “Rebellious Lawyering” practice principles among lawyers who work with underserved communities.  Any lawyer who has been at a Rebellious Lawyering Conference would say there are no other law conferences like these, and they learn “more here in two days than in ten years.”

Some of the reasons for the effectiveness of the Rebellious Lawyering Conferences are these.  First, a Rebellious Lawyering Reader is offered in advance of every conference to participants.  The readings include Rebellious Lawyering (1992) and other works by Gerald P. López elaborating on the application of “Rebellious Lawyering” principles, as well as articles by esteemed colleagues who work in various practice areas.  Thus, upon arriving at the conference, the participants share a common frame of reference.  Visit this page for a sense of past Rebellious Lawyering Conference Readers.

Second, the Rebellious Lawyering panelists, each of whom have been invited by Gerald P. López and the Rebellious Lawyering Institute associates, are proven skilled law educators who are engaged in a wide range of work, whether as providers of direct services, courtroom attorneys, researchers, or law clinicians.  See prior Rebellious Lawyering panelist profiles by visiting the blue links below.

Third, a sizable portion of the Rebellious Lawyering Conference participants have been students of Jerry López or his colleagues, many of whom are also his former students.  Thus, the Rebellious Lawyering Conferences are also reunions of Rebellious Lawyers from throughout the nation.  Most have become repeat Conference participants.  Current law students and recent law graduates are welcome.

Fourth, Rebellious Lawyering Conferences offer Continuing Legal Education (CLE) credits that are accepted in most jurisdictions.

Visit the following links about the Rebellious Lawyering Institute’s four “Rebellious Lawyering” Conferences:

2008 Rebellious Lawyering Conference in Taos, New Mexico

2010 Rebellious Lawyering Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico

2013 Rebellious Lawyering Conference in Santa Fe, New Mexico

2014 Rebellious Lawyering Conference in San Francisco, California

2016 Rebellious Lawyering Conference in San Francisco, California

RebLaw Conferences, Yale Law Students’ Conferences based on teachings of Gerald P. López, Rebellious Lawyering (1992)

Gerald P. López’s Rebellious Lawyering (1992) has had a lasting, far reaching influence on generations of community lawyers, starting when the lawyers were law students in law schools.

Law students at Yale Law School have organized an annual public interest law conference called RebLaw.  “RebLaw is the nation’s largest student-run public interest conference.”

RebLaw encourages law students, public interest law practitioners, and community activists to discuss “innovative, progressive approaches to law and social change… in the spirit of Gerald Lopez‘s Rebellious Lawyering.”  

True to Jerry López’s lifelong teachings, the RebLaw conferences “seek to build a community of law students, practitioners, and activists seeking to work in the service of social change movements and to challenge hierarchies of race, wealth, gender, and expertise within legal practice and education.”

Visit here for RebLaw 2017 at Yale Law School.

Visit here for RebLaw 2016 at Yale Law School.

Visit here for RebLaw 2015 at Yale Law School.

Visit here for articles about RebLaw 1994 through 2015.

#RebelliousLawyering


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